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© Pierre Hébert, Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, 2021

Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, a film by Pierre Hébert
World Premiere

PROGRAMMING

From May 11th, 2021
Cinémathèque québécoise

Cinémathèque québécoise's price scale



Vidéographe is proud to announce that the World Premiere of Pierre Hebert’s latest film, Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, will take place at the Cinémathèque québécoise as part of their New Releases Programme.

The film will premiere on May 11th, 15th, 16th, followed by a discussion with the director. The Cinémathèque québécoise will also present a retrospective of the Places and Monuments series by Pierre Hébert, of which Mount Fuji seen from a moving train is the 11th chapter, from May 11th – 14th.

 

Film synopsis

A poetic and animated meditation based on the impressions experienced by Pierre Hébert during his two trips in Japan, in 2003 and in 2018. Images and sounds, but also captures of his performances, most notably one with the dancer-choreographer Teita Iwabushi. In a certain way, the film tries to answer a fictional question: what is to be seen of Japan when Mount Fuji is invisible, lost in the clouds? Evocation of paradoxical invisibility.

Total duration: 81 min

Genre: Animation, Experimental

 

Access the programme and ticket sales [+]

► Trailer

 

ABOUT

Pierre Hébert

Director of more than 40 films, including three features, Pierre Hébert worked at the National Film Board of Canada from 1965 to 1999. Since then, his filmmaking work has taken a multidisciplinary scope (live animation performances with musicians, video installations, collaboration with choreographers, drawing, and actions on the web). He also wrote several books and articles about cinéma. He recently resumed doing direct scratch animation for which he was well known in the ’80s and the 90’s. He received, in 2005, the Quebec «Albert Tessier» Cinema award for his complete works, in 2012, a career grant of Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec and, in 2018, an Honorary Doctorate by the Emily Carr University of Art and Design, in Vancouver. (pierrehebert.com)

 

Cinémathèque québécoise Art and Test Center

The mission of the Cinémathèque québécoise Art and Test Center (CAECQ) is primarily to program documentaries and independent Quebec fiction films, but also international documentaries, animated films, and foreign films with French subtitles. Favoring opportunities for meetings between the public and the filmmakers. Its programming is presented jointly with that of the Cinémathèque québécoise – New Releases. […]

 

© Pierre Hébert, Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, 2021

Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, a film by Pierre Hébert
World Premiere

PROGRAMMING

From May 11th, 2021
Cinémathèque québécoise

Cinémathèque québécoise's price scale



Vidéographe is proud to announce that the World Premiere of Pierre Hebert’s latest film, Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, will take place at the Cinémathèque québécoise as part of their New Releases Programme.

The film will premiere on May 11th, 15th, 16th, followed by a discussion with the director. The Cinémathèque québécoise will also present a retrospective of the Places and Monuments series by Pierre Hébert, of which Mount Fuji seen from a moving train is the 11th chapter, from May 11th – 14th.

 

Film synopsis

A poetic and animated meditation based on the impressions experienced by Pierre Hébert during his two trips in Japan, in 2003 and in 2018. Images and sounds, but also captures of his performances, most notably one with the dancer-choreographer Teita Iwabushi. In a certain way, the film tries to answer a fictional question: what is to be seen of Japan when Mount Fuji is invisible, lost in the clouds? Evocation of paradoxical invisibility.

Total duration: 81 min

Genre: Animation, Experimental

 

Access the programme and ticket sales [+]

► Trailer

 

ABOUT

Pierre Hébert

Director of more than 40 films, including three features, Pierre Hébert worked at the National Film Board of Canada from 1965 to 1999. Since then, his filmmaking work has taken a multidisciplinary scope (live animation performances with musicians, video installations, collaboration with choreographers, drawing, and actions on the web). He also wrote several books and articles about cinéma. He recently resumed doing direct scratch animation for which he was well known in the ’80s and the 90’s. He received, in 2005, the Quebec «Albert Tessier» Cinema award for his complete works, in 2012, a career grant of Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec and, in 2018, an Honorary Doctorate by the Emily Carr University of Art and Design, in Vancouver. (pierrehebert.com)

 

Cinémathèque québécoise Art and Test Center

The mission of the Cinémathèque québécoise Art and Test Center (CAECQ) is primarily to program documentaries and independent Quebec fiction films, but also international documentaries, animated films, and foreign films with French subtitles. Favoring opportunities for meetings between the public and the filmmakers. Its programming is presented jointly with that of the Cinémathèque québécoise – New Releases. […]

 

© Pierre Hébert, Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, 2021

Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, a film by Pierre Hébert
World Premiere

PROGRAMMING

From May 11th, 2021
Cinémathèque québécoise

Cinémathèque québécoise's price scale



Vidéographe is proud to announce that the World Premiere of Pierre Hebert’s latest film, Mount Fuji seen from a moving train, will take place at the Cinémathèque québécoise as part of their New Releases Programme.

The film will premiere on May 11th, 15th, 16th, followed by a discussion with the director. The Cinémathèque québécoise will also present a retrospective of the Places and Monuments series by Pierre Hébert, of which Mount Fuji seen from a moving train is the 11th chapter, from May 11th – 14th.

 

Film synopsis

A poetic and animated meditation based on the impressions experienced by Pierre Hébert during his two trips in Japan, in 2003 and in 2018. Images and sounds, but also captures of his performances, most notably one with the dancer-choreographer Teita Iwabushi. In a certain way, the film tries to answer a fictional question: what is to be seen of Japan when Mount Fuji is invisible, lost in the clouds? Evocation of paradoxical invisibility.

Total duration: 81 min

Genre: Animation, Experimental

 

Access the programme and ticket sales [+]

► Trailer

 

ABOUT

Pierre Hébert

Director of more than 40 films, including three features, Pierre Hébert worked at the National Film Board of Canada from 1965 to 1999. Since then, his filmmaking work has taken a multidisciplinary scope (live animation performances with musicians, video installations, collaboration with choreographers, drawing, and actions on the web). He also wrote several books and articles about cinéma. He recently resumed doing direct scratch animation for which he was well known in the ’80s and the 90’s. He received, in 2005, the Quebec «Albert Tessier» Cinema award for his complete works, in 2012, a career grant of Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec and, in 2018, an Honorary Doctorate by the Emily Carr University of Art and Design, in Vancouver. (pierrehebert.com)

 

Cinémathèque québécoise Art and Test Center

The mission of the Cinémathèque québécoise Art and Test Center (CAECQ) is primarily to program documentaries and independent Quebec fiction films, but also international documentaries, animated films, and foreign films with French subtitles. Favoring opportunities for meetings between the public and the filmmakers. Its programming is presented jointly with that of the Cinémathèque québécoise – New Releases. […]